In a New York Minute

IN A NEW YORK MINUTE
BY John Tully
THE LOS ANGELES SUN
BBRIDGE

JUNE 17 2004

Being a vocal, loyal fan of the Redskins, Bullets and Redsox at an upstate New York boarding school didn’t go over too well with the lads. He hated their teams right back, as any good D.C.- loving boy would but he was badly outnumbered. The Big Apple’s teams and in turn, the City, had been his nemesis for years and moving to the coast only strengthened that rivalry.

He used to fly People Express in and out of Newark and it was hell. The bus to Port Authority and the cruise to Canal Street was always a fun adventure but he had absolutely revelled in not being a Newyorker.

Seventeen years and a minute later he fell hard.

MISTA? Hello?!
Can you blame him?
Every polish waitress, every Ecuadorian launderer,
Indian Cabdriver, downtown hipster, bodega owner and Yankee Stadium attendee treated him like a king.

Gettheheckouta’ere!
What gives?

The smell of burnt pretzels and Sabrett hot dogs with cars whizzing/honking by; a beautiful day in Central Park and the sun going down right exactly over the West Village. Thirty Irish bars in ten square blocks, thousands of great restaurants and a subway that works.

He gave in.

Seventeen years later he fell in love with a city that never sleeps and it was all over. But it wasn’t until he flew back to the coast that evening that he choked-up when he figured it out:
this was a truly great town that had been attacked; it’s heart broken just two and a half years before.

Just when he had lost faith in pretty much all of mankind, this good, noble, wounded yet resilient city had given him some hope that America could still be great.

The beautiful woman didn’t hurt either.

Dennis Hopper Admitted to Hospital

Actor Dennis Hopper In Hospital With “Flu” Symptoms

hopper_fonda

The San Francisco Chronicle

Veteran actor Dennis Hopper has been admitted to a New York hospital, suffering from influenza-like symptoms.

The actor, 73, took ill on Wednesday afternoon with a stomach complaint, his representative has confirmed.

His full condition was unknown as WENN went to press.

As a result of his illness, Hopper has been forced to pull out of several appearances on talk shows including “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” and “Today.”

The actor is in the Big Apple to promote his new TV show, “Crash,” a series based on the Academy Award-winning 2004 movie.

Newsflash: Dogs Get Jealous, Especially Ones That Don’t Live In Venice Beach California

Test reveals dogs’ jealous side
annoy

Scientists in Austria say they have found a basic form of jealousy in dogs.

The Vienna-based researchers showed that dogs will stop doing a simple task when not rewarded if another dog, which continues to be rewarded, is present.

Writing in the journal PNAS, the scientists say this shows a sensitivity in dogs that was only previously found in primates.

The researchers now plan to extend their experiments to look at co-operative behaviour in wolves.

The experiment consisted of taking pairs of dogs and getting them to present a paw for a reward. On giving this “handshake” the dogs received a piece of food.

One of the dogs was then asked to shake hands, but received no food. The other dog continued to get the food when it was asked to perform the task.

Reward value

The dog without the reward quickly stopped doing the task, and showed signs of annoyance or stress when its partner was rewarded.

To make sure that the experiment was really showing the interaction between the dogs rather than just the frustration of not being rewarded, a similar experiment was conducted where the dogs performed the task without the partner. Here they continued to present the paw for much longer.

Dr Frederike Range from the department of neurobiology and cognition research at the University of Vienna, says this shows that it was the presence of the rewarded partner which was the greater influence on their behaviour.

“The only difference is one gets food and the other doesn’t, they are responding to being unequally rewarded.” she said.

The researchers say this kind of behaviour, where one animal gets frustrated with what is happening with another, has only been observed in primates before.

Studies with various types of monkeys and chimpanzees show they react not only to seeing their partners receiving rewards when they are not, but also to the type of reward.

The dog study also looked at whether the type of reward made a difference. Dogs were given either bread or sausage, but seemed to react equally to either. Dr Range says this may be because they have been trained.

“It’s through the fact they have to work for the reward, this confers it with a higher value,” she said.

Evolution

The researchers say this behaviour, reacting to others receiving rewards, may represent an earlier stage in the evolution of co-operative behaviours seen in human and primates.

“I think it’s a precursor, simpler than in humans, it’s a selfish behaviour, they don’t react to seeing others treated unfairly. With humans they react, say it’s unfair, we can’t see anything like that in the dogs,” said Dr Range.

The researchers say the type of behaviour exhibited in the experiment is probably due to the dog’s close association with humans. Dr Range says other animals need to be studied to really show how animals naturally exhibit jealousies or cooperate.

“I’m sure that it’s not something that evolved with the dogs, we will have to test it in wolves and other cooperating species,” she said.

Dr Range is currently rearing wolf cubs in order to perform similar experiments. She says the wolves will be able to do the paw test, but that it is really the wrong experiment. She regards this as something unnatural, that dogs are taught by their owners.

“They can give the paw, but it’s not the right test. We must take the human out of the equation, then we can compare directly wolves with dogs.”

The Los Angeles Dodgers Win a Playoff Game Before a Record-Breaking Crowd and Vin Scully at Chavez Ravine

Associated Press

Dodgers Beat Phillies, Fight Way Back Into NLCS

LOS ANGELES (AP) -Tired of getting brushed back in the NL championship series, Manny Ramirez and the Los Angeles Dodgers came out ready to fight their way back against Philadelphia.

Blake DeWitt’s bases-loaded triple off Jamie Moyer capped a five-run first inning, and the feisty Dodgers beat the Phillies 7-2 on Sunday night to trim Philadelphia’s lead to 2-1 in the best-of-seven series.

The benches and bullpens emptied moments after Los Angeles starter Hiroki Kuroda threw a pitch over Shane Victorino’s head, with an angry Ramirez barking at the Phillies during the dustup.

But there were no punches or ejections, and the Dodgers played with poise all night.

Kuroda pitched effectively into the seventh for Los Angeles, which will try to even the series Monday night. Game 1 loser Derek Lowe, working on three days’ rest, will face Philadelphia’s Joe Blanton in a matchup of right-handers.

Kuroda buzzed Victorino in the third, apparently an attempt to retaliate for Philadelphia’s Brett Myers throwing behind Ramirez in Game 2.

Plate umpire Mike Everitt immediately warned both teams. Victorino shouted at Kuroda while pointing at his own head and upper body as if to say: “It’s OK to throw at my body, but not my head.”

Victorino grounded out to first baseman Nomar Garciaparra and then exchanged words with Kuroda near the bag. Both dugouts emptied and the bullpens followed, but no punches were thrown and there were no ejections.

Dodgers third base coach Larry Bowa and Phillies first base coach Davey Lopes appeared to be two of the angriest participants in the near-scuffle, yelling at each other before the teams cleared the field. Ramirez also came in from left field to bark at the Phillies and had to be restrained by teammates, manager Joe Torre and an umpire.

Myers threw behind Ramirez in the first inning of Game 2 on Friday, and Los Angeles’ Russell Martin was brushed back as well. The soft-tossing Moyer hit Martin with a pitch in the first inning Sunday night, and reliever Clay Condrey knocked down the Dodgers’ catcher in the second.

Martin was hit by another pitch in the seventh, by Chad Durbin, drawing a boos from the crowd and prompting Ramirez to climb to the top step of the dugout, but he took first base without incident.

The Phillies and Dodgers don’t have a recent history of animosity, unlike Boston and Tampa Bay, the ALCS participants. The Red Sox and Rays have played two peaceful games in their series after a nasty brawl in June.

The Phillies and Dodgers have played 11 times this year including eight in the regular season, with the home team winning every game. And the Dodgers’ 23-9 record at home after the All-Star break was the best in the majors.

Kuroda, a 33-year-old rookie making just the second postseason start of a career that includes 11 years in the Japanese Central League, gave up only five hits and two runs with one walk and three strikeouts before being relieved by Cory Wade with two on and nobody out in the seventh. Wade retired the next three batters to end the inning.

Kuroda worked 6 1-3 shutout innings in the Dodgers’ 3-1 victory over the Cubs in the division-clincher Oct. 4. He was 1-0 with a 1.38 ERA in two starts against the Phillies during the regular season, allowing four hits and two runs in 13 innings.

The 45-year-old Moyer, who became the oldest pitcher to start a league championship game, lasted only 1 1-3 innings for his shortest outing since July 4, 1998 and gave up six hits and six runs.

The Dodgers had a 1-0 lead by the time Moyer had thrown five pitches on singles by Rafael Furcal, Andre Ethier and Ramirez. Casey Blake singled in another run before DeWitt lined a 2-2 pitch into the right field corner to clear the bases and send the towel-waving, blue-clad fans at Dodger Stadium into a frenzy.

The Phillies got a run in the second on Ryan Howard’s leadoff double and a two-out, RBI single by Pedro Feliz, but Furcal hit Moyer’s first pitch over the left-center field wall to make it 6-1.

Moyer’s night was done after he retired Ethier on a fly to center. Six of the 11 batters Moyer faced hit safely, and he also hit a batter.

Nomar Garciaparra, making his first start of the postseason, hit a two-out, RBI single off J.A. Happ in the fourth to extend the Dodgers’ lead to 7-1.

The Phillies didn’t have a base runner after Feliz’s second-inning hit until Chase Utley doubled to start the seventh. Ryan Howard and Pat Burrell followed with singles to make it 7-2 and chase Kuroda. Wade worked out of trouble by striking out Jayson Werth before retiring Feliz on a fly to center and pinch hitter Greg Dobbs on a grounder to short.

Utley drew a two-out walk in the first for his fifth free pass in six plate appearances dating back to Game 2, and was thrown out trying to steal with Howard batting. It was the first attempted stolen base by either team in the series.

Ramirez, who entered with 18 hits in 53 at-bats 10 homers and 20 RBIs against Moyer in his career, raised his postseason RBI total to 72 – eight shy of Bernie Williams’ record. Ramirez also walked twice and flied to right.

The announced attendance of 56,800 – 800 over listed capacity – was the largest crowd in Dodger Stadium history. Tiger Woods was a guest in Dodgers owner Frank McCourt’s box, wearing a Dodgers cap and NL West division champions T-shirt.

Sunday marked the 20th anniversary of the last time the Dodgers won the NLCS, shutting out the New York Mets 6-0 in Game 7 at home. The Dodgers went on to win the World Series, beating Oakland in five games. This is the first time they’ve advanced past the first round since that time.

Notes: Moyer, who turns 46 next month, became the second-oldest pitcher to start a postseason game, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. The oldest was Jack Quinn, who was 46 years, 99 days when he started Game 4 of the 1929 World Series for the Philadelphia A’s. … The ceremonial first pitch was thrown out by Steve Garvey, Lopes, Bill Russell and Ron Cey, who made up the Dodgers’ infield for a big league-record 8 1/2 seasons and played in the World Series in 1974, 1977, 1978 and 1981 World Series. … Martin stole second in the seventh for the first steal of the series.

MLB DOT COM

LOS ANGELES — The Dodgers finally responded Sunday to perceived bullying tactics of the Phillies with an emotion-charged 7-2 victory in Game 3 of the National League Championship Series, which was interrupted by a benches-clearing standoff in the third inning.

complete postseason coverage

Blake DeWitt capped a five-run first inning with a bases-loaded triple off Jamie Moyer, who also allowed RBI singles to Manny Ramirez and Casey Blake. The Phillies answered with a run off Kuroda in the second on a double by Ryan Howard and RBI single by Pedro Feliz, but Rafael Furcal homered on Moyer’s first pitch in the bottom of the second.

Benches and bullpens cleared shortly after Kuroda threw behind the head of Phillies leadoff hitter Shane Victorino with two out in the top of the third inning, triggering a warning to Kuroda and both clubs by plate umpire Mike Everitt.

Everitt interpreted the pitch to be retaliation for Phillies reliever Clay Condrey knocking down Russell Martin with a pitch at his chin in the bottom of the second inning. It was the second knockdown this series of Martin, who also was hit by a Moyer curveball in the first inning Sunday.

Hiroki Kuroda, who triggered the confrontation with a retaliatory purpose pitch, allowed one run over six-plus innings, another clutch postseason start after he beat the Cubs in the clincher of the NL Division Series last weekend.

Manny Ramirez and Joe Torre Spotted in Venice Beach Drinking Wheatgrass Shots at Herer’s Hemp Stand

Manny Ramirez brings bat and baggage to Los Angeles Dodgers

In the biggest late-season acquisition in club history, the Dodgers acquire power-hitting left fielder from the Boston Red Sox. They’re counting on him to carry them into October.

Bill Plaschke

LOS ANGELES TIMES

August 1, 2008

He will arrive at Dodger Stadium today lugging 510 career home runs inside 510 pounds of baggage.

He will take his place in the middle of the Dodger batting order tonight as one of baseball’s biggest hitters and most baffling headaches.

In the biggest late-season acquisition in club history, the Dodgers acquired left fielder Manny Ramirez on Thursday from the Boston Red Sox and Mars.

They are counting on him to carry them into October and beyond.

Just as soon as they can find him.

Three hours after the trade, Ned Colletti, Dodger general manager, was asked whether he had spoken to Ramirez.

“I left him a message,” said Colletti.

Four hours after the trade, Dodger Manager Joe Torre was asked whether he had spoken to Ramirez.

“I left him a message,” said Torre.

Days after the Angels grabbed the national sports spotlight by trading for quiet slugger Mark Teixeira, the Dodgers have thrown a massive counterpunch by acquiring a guy who is part Hollywood and part Dagwood.

A guy who occasionally swings like Babe Ruth and is consistently as nutty as a Baby Ruth.

The only thing that flops around more than his trademark dreadlocks are his moods.

Nobody in baseball history has hit more postseason homers — 24 — yet when the 2007 world champion Red Sox visited the White House, Ramirez didn’t show up.

“I guess his grandmother died again,” President Bush said at the time. “Just kidding.”

Perhaps nobody in baseball history has performed better in a more pressure-filled World Series, as he was the MVP of the 2004 Series that broke the Red Sox’s 86-year title drought.

Yet a couple of weeks ago, during a sixth-inning pitching change at Fenway Park, he momentarily departed left field to make a cellphone call.

The Red Sox have long shrugged off such behavior as “Manny being Manny.”

But recently, with Ramirez ripping club executives in preparation for his probable departure as a free agent this winter, the Red Sox finally decided Manny could be Manny somewhere else.

Officially, the Dodgers acquired Ramirez in a three-team trade that cost them third-base prospect Andy LaRoche and pitcher Bryan Morris, who worked in class-A.

Unofficially, it doesn’t take a Laker fan to understand that they were given a gift the size of Pau Gasol.

Neither Dodger kid was considered a top prospect,

and the Red Sox agreed to pay the remainder of Ramirez’s $21-million annual salary, about $7 million.

“It’s crazy,” said Torre. “This is a huge ‘get’ for us.”

It is actually two “gets” for the price of none.

They do not have to pay someone who immediately becomes their best hitter. And, because of his impending free agency, they are not obligated to tolerate his nutty behavior beyond this season.

He is probably here only for two months, but with a swing that is as unshakable as his smile, he is capable of carrying the Dodgers every day of those two months.

“Three months,” corrected Dodger owner Frank McCourt, adding a month for the playoffs and World Series. “We’re going to have a great three months of baseball.”

It was Boston native McCourt who pushed for this deal Thursday morning, just hours before the trading deadline, when he realized that the Red Sox were truly serious about dealing their recurring headache.

In the weak National League West, one hitter could elevate his pitching-rich team to the top. And amid the inexperienced National League teams that will make the playoffs, one hitter could provide the postseason difference.

Ramirez, even at age 36, is still clearly that hitter, leading the Red Sox with 20 home runs and ranking second with 68 RBIs at the time of the trade.

“This team has hung in there all season with all these injuries. This is about giving them a chance to go for it,” said McCourt. “This is about paying back our loyal fans and rewarding our hard-working team.”

The fans will get it, and were already loudly cheering just the scoreboard announcement of the trade Thursday night.

The clubhouse may be a more difficult sell, particularly because Ramirez not only creates distractions, but a total of five potential starting outfielders.

“This is why we have a guy like Joe Torre as manager,” said McCourt.

Indeed, other than the Red Sox’s Terry Francona, probably the only other current major league manager who can handle Ramirez is Torre, who constantly dealt with wacky late-season acquisitions with the New York Yankees.

Torre, who was constantly haunted by Ramirez during the Yankee-Red Sox rivalry, said, “It’s funny, but I did everything I could not to have to see him again, and all of a sudden he’s showing up in the uniform I’m wearing.”

He smiled. “It’s pretty special.”

Pretty strange. Pretty, yeah, pretty special.

Bill Plaschke can be reached at bill.plaschke@latimes.com. To read previous columns by Plaschke, go to latimes.com/plaschke.

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